Thoughtground
I'm Na'im (Nah-eem)
Peace, Love & Trees.
Sex, and other things.
Music is the prescribed philosophy.
Thoughtground
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spaceplasma:

IC1871 Emission Nebula
IC1871 is a part of the “Soul” nebula (IC1848). If you look at a wide field image of the Soul nebula, it is the portion near the dark lane on the upper left side. The image shown is a high resolution image of that area. This nebula is located around 6500 light years away in the constellation Cassiopeia.

Credit: Leonardo Orazi
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mineralia:

Azurite and Malachite
by Bill Gracey
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"We are just an advanced breed of monkeys on a minor planet of a very average star. But we can understand the Universe. That makes us something very special."
Stephen Hawking (via lazyyogi)
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mothernaturenetwork:

Scientists translate gamma rays to music
By converting distant gamma-ray bursts to harp, cello and piano notes, NASA researchers say they’ve found a new way of ‘listening to the universe.’
Joyful Abandon: Meditation: What are you waiting for?
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"Relax and watch the ‘I am’. Reality is just behind it. Keep quiet, keep silent; it will emerge, or, rather, it will take you in."
Nisargadatta Maharaj (via lazyyogi)
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"Life can be found only in the present moment. The past is gone, the future is not yet here, and if we do not go back to ourselves in the present moment, we cannot be in touch with life."
Thich Nhat Hanh (via lazyyogi)
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alanfriedman:

Nephelococcygia
It’s the long way of describing our love for seeing likenesses in the shapes of clouds. If you are bitten by this bug and find yourself with a solar telescope, watch out. The fantastic plumes of hydrogen plasma we call solar prominences seen at the edge of sun will tempt you to identify them in earthly forms. I once set out to classify a bunch and this was the result. A Yeti, a bonsai, Don Quixote, the angel that fell to earth… there’s even one that looks like me or did, when I wore a goatee. Click on the picture to see the big version from my website. Each image there is a hot link to a little bit of averted imagination. Enjoy!
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"Some believers accuse skeptics of having nothing left but a dull, cold, scientific world. I am left with only art, music, literature, theatre, the magnificence of nature, mathematics, the human spirit, sex, the cosmos, friendship, history, science, imagination, dreams, oceans, mountains, love, and the wonder of birth. That’ll do for me."
Lynne Kelly (via lucifelle)
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Fundamentals of The Multiverse
Images: Conceptual renderings of what Multiverses might look like
Andrei Linde at Stanford has brought forward the cosmological model of a multiverse, which he calls the “self-reproducing inflationary universe.” The theory is based on Alan Guth’s inflation model, and it includes multiple universes woven together in some kind of spacetime foam. Each universe exists in a closed volume of space and time. Linde’s model, based on advanced principles of quantum physics, defies easy visualisation. Quite simplified, it suggests quantum fluctuations in the universe’s inflationary expansion period to have a wavelike character. Linde theorises that these waves can “freeze” atop one another, thus magnifying their effect.
The stacked-up quantum waves can in turn create such intense disruptions in scalar fields -the underlying fields that determine the behaviour of elementary particles- that they exceed a critical mass and start procreating new inflationary domains. The multiverse, Linde contends, is like a growing fractal, sprouting inflationary domains, with each domain spreading and cooling into a new universe.
If Linde is correct, our universe is just one of the sprouts. The theory neatly straddles two ancient ideas about the universe: that it had a definite beginning, and that it had existed forever. In Linde’s view, each particular part of the multiverse, including our part, began from a singularity somewhere in the past, but that singularity was just one of an endless series that was spawned before it and will continue after it.

Fundamentals of The Multiverse
Images: Conceptual renderings of what Multiverses might look like
Andrei Linde at Stanford has brought forward the cosmological model of a multiverse, which he calls the “self-reproducing inflationary universe.” The theory is based on Alan Guth’s inflation model, and it includes multiple universes woven together in some kind of spacetime foam. Each universe exists in a closed volume of space and time. Linde’s model, based on advanced principles of quantum physics, defies easy visualisation. Quite simplified, it suggests quantum fluctuations in the universe’s inflationary expansion period to have a wavelike character. Linde theorises that these waves can “freeze” atop one another, thus magnifying their effect.
The stacked-up quantum waves can in turn create such intense disruptions in scalar fields -the underlying fields that determine the behaviour of elementary particles- that they exceed a critical mass and start procreating new inflationary domains. The multiverse, Linde contends, is like a growing fractal, sprouting inflationary domains, with each domain spreading and cooling into a new universe.
If Linde is correct, our universe is just one of the sprouts. The theory neatly straddles two ancient ideas about the universe: that it had a definite beginning, and that it had existed forever. In Linde’s view, each particular part of the multiverse, including our part, began from a singularity somewhere in the past, but that singularity was just one of an endless series that was spawned before it and will continue after it.

Fundamentals of The Multiverse
Images: Conceptual renderings of what Multiverses might look like
Andrei Linde at Stanford has brought forward the cosmological model of a multiverse, which he calls the “self-reproducing inflationary universe.” The theory is based on Alan Guth’s inflation model, and it includes multiple universes woven together in some kind of spacetime foam. Each universe exists in a closed volume of space and time. Linde’s model, based on advanced principles of quantum physics, defies easy visualisation. Quite simplified, it suggests quantum fluctuations in the universe’s inflationary expansion period to have a wavelike character. Linde theorises that these waves can “freeze” atop one another, thus magnifying their effect.
The stacked-up quantum waves can in turn create such intense disruptions in scalar fields -the underlying fields that determine the behaviour of elementary particles- that they exceed a critical mass and start procreating new inflationary domains. The multiverse, Linde contends, is like a growing fractal, sprouting inflationary domains, with each domain spreading and cooling into a new universe.
If Linde is correct, our universe is just one of the sprouts. The theory neatly straddles two ancient ideas about the universe: that it had a definite beginning, and that it had existed forever. In Linde’s view, each particular part of the multiverse, including our part, began from a singularity somewhere in the past, but that singularity was just one of an endless series that was spawned before it and will continue after it.